Triptych – Advanced Multidisciplinary Studio

A triptych is a work of art that has three separate pieces that are visually and/or thematically related, but which do not physically touch. Create a triptych with these requirements: one part will be a found object, one part will be made entirely of clay, one part will be made of metal.

I started with a list of potential ideas and subjects I could base my sculptures off of in my sketch book. These are the concepts I considered during the ideation process:

  • Animals
  • Fear
  • Parts of the body
  • Clay tools
  • Kitchen utensils
  • Happiness
  • Light

I then chose five of those listed to expand, creating columns for clay, metal, and found object. The concept I stuck with was “light”, it was a warm day and the sun was out for the first time since the winter. I was inspired by brightness and warmth and decided on making a ceramic light bulb, metal sunglasses, and found a tiny flashlight and extra large matches.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My next step was to sketch what I want the sculptures to look like. The shapes I wanted to make were pretty simple and common, so drawing them was not difficult. I knew the process of creating them would be much more difficult.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Both items are machine made, and my sculpting does not match that, so  I needed to consider how an imperfect shape would add and take away from the idea of light. I created two maquettes to explore the basic shapes and how the materials would behave for my purposes.

The maquettes didn’t prepare me for the difficulties I would have when dealing in a large scale. When clay is very wet and plastic, it completely lacks structure, and when the piece is huge and needs to support itself it’s nearly impossible to get very far. When I punched out a cavity of a large ball of clay, I balled up a towel and put it in the cavity to keep it round and set a space heater on it for a while. The space heater accelerated the drying process and made the clay more leather hard and the perfect consistency for sculpting. Handling the piece with newly formed structure was much easier, but it was still very heavy so I needed to scrape away layers from the inside to make the walls thinner. When I got both pieces bisque fired, I connected them with car body filler. I covered the screw in graphite and poured different colored wax on the bulb.

I contended with a weight and structure problem with the metal as well. I finished each lens first and connected the two with the part that rests on one’s nose. Because both lenses were so heavy, the connecting part needed to be stronger to support the whole sculpture. Once I was able to securely connect the two halves, I was able to attach the arms of the glasses and finish the piece.

 

 

 

Learning Objectives:

  • To explore special issues of working in large scale (time, cost, connotation, etc).
  • To develop an understanding of how meaning in art is generated through the relationships among the artist, the art, and the viewer;
  • To learn to link varied materials together through the connotation of the objects;
  • To cultivate the ability to explore, research, and develop personal ideas and themes;
  • To develop a system of sketching and drawing methods that will allow you to investigate, conceptualize and bring ideas through to a finished project;
  • To use drawings and maquettes to develop ideas and forms;
  • To learn to choose appropriate fabrication techniques to realize ideas;
  • To develop an understanding of the principles and elements of design and begin to apply them effectively in your own work;
  • To develop a vocabulary of the principles and elements of design and the ability to use it in discussing and writing about art.

Project Terminology: Triptych, Found objects, Made objects

Required Materials & Supplies: Steel is available for Sculpture; everything else must be supplied by you.

  1. List of Artists: Bring in examples of diptychs or triptychs to share with class.
Triptych example
https://www.sculpture.org/portfolio/sculpture_info.php?sculpture_id=1007267
  1. Sketchbook/ideation process requirements: Sketchbook will be turned in and should reflect significant time spent on ideation process.

 

 

 

Syntheses of Falling Face First into the Future and Handspeak 2018

Falling Face First into the Future Synthesis

 

I read about the highly complicated process behind creating products and applied them to some modern technologies. There are many inventions that have had a huge effect on humanity in various ways across the spectrum of society. I learned about the history of the fork, the nature of engineering, and how we became the culture we are today.

 

Handspeak

 

I put up my first gallery show this January to showcase my hands. I’ve been working on them for 6 years as a personal project. It wasn’t until one of the owners of the Community Clay Center suggested I do a show that I began collecting my old hands and making more. Even though it seems like this is what years of work has been leading up to, I’m still working on hands. I am still noticing ways I can represent what I need to. I still have a 50 pound block of clay at home in my room waiting. I still notice everyone’s fingers and palms and wrists and elbows. Based on this, I don’t think I’m close to being truly finished with this series.

 

Falling Face First into the Future

The nature of invention comes from necessity. We build things when we need them, we improve on things we don’t think work well. Every day we walk around unsatisfied with products, food, and service in our society and can often think it’s an inescapable pod of mediocrity that requires a change in our own behavior to accommodate the inadequacy of these products. Inventors know they can change that. The mindset is about noticing how people use everything – what it makes them think or feel, if it’s an easy thing to use, if it looks attractive and makes people want to use it, and most importantly if it does what it is supposed to do when used as directed. The art of making things is a multifaceted monolith that can range from a fully automated motor powered door stopper that is beautiful and has all the right marketing, to the fork, that is overshadowed in simplicity, necessity, and universality only by the spoon.

 

A LEASH ISSUE

A friend of mine just got her first dog, a shy Bernese – Beagle mix. She recently upgraded from the faded pink and yellow nylon leash she was given by the shelter, to a shiny red retractable leash. This leash has a smooth, plastic handle with thin rope line that winds and unwinds with buttons pressed by the thumb. This mechanism lets the dog go farther while still being under the control of the owner.  Someone thought the classic leash was not enough, that the idea of walking ones dog could be freer, more exciting, with the same sense of security. As my friend grabbed the new leash, she said “oh, how do you feel about these? I only use it sometimes, sorry.” She told me that there is a community of people who believe retractable leashes are more dangerous than they are beneficial. The huge unintended consequences of such a small change in mechanism is very interesting to me.

For every owner that felt an improvement in the quality of their walks via the increase in the dogs’ roaming radius, there is a victim of bad timing and interface flaws. A few years ago a woman found herself missing a finger after her dog took off at full speed chasing a squirrel. The thin rope wrapped tight around the finger when she tried to grab the line in a panic to regain control and pulled it off. There are many cases of user issues; when a person is in a panic, it is very difficult to predict what they will do.

The success and longevity of a product is also hugely dependent on the quality of its materials and assembly. I think one purpose of a product made with quality materials that was assembled with care is to reduce the possibilities of human error. This includes using materials that won’t behave like scissors when enough pressure is applied. There are too many unpredictable situations so we base our designs on flaws we’ve seen before. Then, when the worst does happen, the flaw seems obvious – dogs will pull on the leash, don’t make it out of line thin enough so it can effectively apply decapitating force when the dog pulls on the leash.

Assuming the consumer will utilize the product correctly, if it is made with inferior materials and or haphazardly put together, any normal function of the leash could become dangerous. In 2008 a company that manufactured very cheap retractable leashes recalled them because of multiple cases of injuries caused by the metal clasp breaking like shrapnel and lodging itself in anything nearby. A 2007 analysis of injuries directly related to retractable leashes by the Consumer Product Safety Commission found 16,564 hospitalizations were caused by the leashes. Something about these leashes was not working for the public, but how many of these injuries were caused by human error and how many were a flaw in the product?

 

INVENTING WITHIN THE PLANETARY RESOURCE BUDGET

As a species, Humans have achieved an incredible level of evolution. We are able to take resources from the Earth and utilize them not only to provide food, shelter, and water, but also an industry focused on quality of life. Humans have done the most manipulation of planetary resources and have created a powerful relationship with objects. These objects focus on communication, transportation, personal comforts, things that can make life a little bit easier.

During the early 1800’s humanity developed a new way to thrive through automated machinery. From machines that print text uniformly and quickly, ones that drive us farther distances faster, that let us communicate with others, we learned how to control fire – how to use combustion to our benefit. Like anything that is cool, new, and untested over time, society loved everything about these new brilliant milestones in human history. Factories were built, mines were dug, and a new age of convenience quickly overtook our populace.

With more control over our environment comes the ability to explore and try to understand it. The scientific and medical industry exploded with their own branches of mind blowing discoveries, and with this were able to indicate that we may have an effect on the planet with all this rapid development. Waste was building, the oceans were warming, the atmosphere was coughing, and at some point a community of scientists started spreading information about the repercussions. With basic mechanistic needs having been met by most people, the new adventurous trend in exploring the boundaries of discovery is eco-friendly gadgets and processes. Existing products are being revamped into energy efficient, lighter, and renewable versions trying to relieve the planet of our burden.

“Efficiency” and “sustainability” are now golden buzzwords in the design and production world, with everyone knowing more power consumption also means more monetary consumption. Though the development cost drives up the prestige of eco-friendly living, once achieved, provides a way bigger benefit on small and large scales over time. Energy efficient light bulbs, electric cars, solar grids, and wind turbines are some products that have been borne of necessity within this recent zeitgeist.

For a long time old rubber tires were piled up and burned. There became this huge issue of what to do with a now useless item made of materials that don’t decompose, so things like tire recycling plants were developed. Tires are ground into smaller, uniform pieces and repurposed. We have developed many behaviors to alleviate and cope with the garbage problem, but inventing a way to avoid the garbage in the first place is another step forward. Michelin is working on a 3D printed, biodegradable tire. The lifespan of each tire is significantly longer because when the tread wears down it is reparable by printing on another few layers. I think this is the perfect marriage of social benefit with ease of production and eco-consciousness.

There are 268.8 million registered cars in the US, all using tires that will get worn out and thrown away. Though it would be ideal to equip every vehicle with some 3D printed tires and alleviate one damaging industry, the cost and feasibility need to be accounted for. Reports about how the tires performed on various terrains and seasons over time, how they do on hot roads, on frozen roads. The time it takes the tread to wear down and how often the tires require maintenance need to be tested and estimated.  I want to know what it takes to break one of these tires, what to do with a broken tire, how it behaves when its broken on a moving vehicle, how much pressure the tires can withstand. 3D printing is reaching new levels of affordability now that the technology is being streamlined and normalized, but the cost of mass produced 3D printed tires is still unknown and can be a huge blockade in whether or not this technology takes off.

 

INVENTING CULTURE

Quick product change and design that is coupled with the efficiency of growing technology and manufacturing also has a huge effect on culture and the speed at which it changes. Anthropologists in one thousand years will have the evolution and growth of Apple catalogued as epochs in human development. The rise and fall of civilizations happen in between updated versions of your Iphone. This necessitates introspection about how this rapid change can look like in various other socio-economic and governmental facets.

The article A Practical Approach to Teaching Abstract Product Design Issues from the Journal of Engineering Design (Vol. 20, No. 5, October 2009, 511–521) written by Wouter Eggink from University of Twente, Faculty of Engineering Technology had this to say about the role invention and engineering has on cultural shifts, and how this knowledge can be utilized in the classroom, “…we are aware that it is not only important that the students practice with emotions and meaning, but also that engineers are aware of the societal consequences of product design and the matching responsibility of the designer as an actor in a societal context. In the end, it is also a means of coming to different products than the obligatory mobile phones, coffee makers or mp3 players.” Eggink talks about using abstract and philosophical themes with his students to get them to understand the bigger effects something they create can have.

 

FORKS

A pivotal stage in early human development can objectively be identified as when we started cooking our food. A richer and vaster range of nutrients was able to develop the human brain and lead it into the modern level of functioning.  I read an interview between Ira Flatow of npr and Bee Wilson, author of Consider the Fork, regarding the evolution of kitchen utensils and the role silverware had in changing our jaw structure. He talks about how recently jaw bones shifted from an “edge-to-edge bite” to the overbite we all have. “If anthropologist called C. Loring Brace is correct, the adoption of the knife and fork at table, which happened roughly 250 years ago in society at large in Europe and then in the States – if he is right, then the adoption of the knife and fork actually had these profound implications on the structure of the human jaw.” The bones of many people have told us that this overbite shift happened too quickly and recently for it to have been a result of evolution, so the conclusion comes to the tools we use to eat our food. When thinking about the social implications of product development, I never thought about the physical ramifications if the invention were to become prolific. Would it be fair to compare a fork to the modern cellphone? How do you think a smartphone could change our physiology over time?

Like the cellphone, the concept of a fork came from a want for convenience, started with crude early versions, and were developed over time. When humans began cooking food there was born the need for a tool to hold the food while it cools and to cut it into smaller pieces to avoid burning the mouth. Henry Petroski’s The Evolution of Useful Things taught me a ton about the history of the fork. He writes about two-tined beginnings in Italy, its coevolution with the blunted butter knife, and its growth to the sleek four pronged masterpiece we have now.

What I recently came to realize was just like any other new concept, the whole population wouldn’t be so quick to embrace the new fork rage. Petroski brings up a quote in the Western Literary Cabinet from 1853 in observance of fork culture it likens using one to eating soup with a knitting needle. Bee Wilson had this to say about the slow growth of the popularity of the fork, “it encountered huge resistance when it was first introduced. And for a long time in Europe, it was only the Italians who used forks. The reason being pasta, as we all know, forks are the perfect implement for twizzling long strands of noodles or spaghetti. But in the rest of Europe, particularly Britain, they thought that forks were just these weird, effeminate, unnecessary objects, which we could do fine without.” This amazingly simple and nearly universal concept, it’s funny to imagine, began as a trend that spread and stuck.

Everything we use has been manufactured to cater specifically to peoples’ senses. The process of making and selling products, regardless of the purpose, is an interdisciplinary endeavor. Things like colors, shape, texture, size, and materials being used plays pivotal roles in the success of a product. The general public wants something intuitive, aesthetically pleasing, and easy to handle. Putting product design into a few simple categories helps sort out the oceans of data that needs to be considered when marketing to the public. But your public is 7 billion individuals of infinite needs, mental and physical disabilities, varying levels of intuition and common sense, cultural and language barriers, economic and ecological considerations, available materials, machines, tools, and machinists. Making something consistently and universally simple to use is the most complex process in product design.

 

Organic Machine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting the sheets of metal to curve in a way that fit together took a lot of hammering and clamping. I started welding the pieces together in the middle, which led to irreversible warping at the ends. I started over, welding at the tips of the machine this time leading the pieces in one way. I was able to bend the pieces to make the proper shape, which ended up curving like an “S” to all fit together. When I made the paper templates, the paper naturally bent to that shape because it is so malleable. With the metal I had to force it into that shape. MIG

 

 

Personal Learning Network

Twitter was pretty interesting to get used to but once I did it was fun and I found myself wanting to explore the world of tweets. I followed a variety of companies and people. I had to make myself participate in this, but it became a bit of a habit. This platform allowed me to see comments and projects from companies and people that I would not have seen on other media sites. It’s really cool to see what is new and active and the people who are in charge of these groups doing what I’m striving to do.

I found it difficult at first to pay attention and care about what’s happening on twitter and it is still not my biggest source of networking, but I’ve found it is very easy and quick to reach out to anyone at any time. The website is now so prolific many people of interest are involved. I tweeted out to a few big design companies. I did not get responses but that doesn’t mean I will never get a response. One tweet I posted was my first logo design and a design company in India retweeted it.

summary synthesis

My degree is about marrying science with art in creating new technologies that help society. These processes are helped by computer aided design applications and 3D printing. What I’ve done is take graphic design classes, physics, sculpture, and maths and combine them into a new field. I found as I was compiling my program that the engineering field contains the combination of everything I am interested in.

My AP is focused on taking skills I learned in graphic design classes and applying them to design a logo for the interdisciplinary studies department. It would be a fun addition to the department and help in visually aid people in getting an idea about what interdisciplinarity is about.

My RA explores the explosion of 3D printing and CAD technology and its socioeconomic ramifications. Both these technologies made the process of creating and producing things significantly quicker, easier, and with more accuracy.

 

My first logo design

I recently attained computer drawing tools that will allow me to work with the primary applications used by industrial designers. With this new medium I am now able to design a logo and business cards and a variety of other name building details that will help me market my skills to potential employers. I am thankful to be taking a class that is teaching me how to use these applications because they are not entirely intuitive and take a long time to get used to. They can also get quite frustrating if certain things are overlooked and every step is essential.

first business card design

The final version will have my name and contact information.

Literature search

Hall, Joan SchneiderJulie. “Why Most Product Launches Fail.” Harvard Business Review, 31 July 2014, hbr.org/2011/04/why-most-product-launches-fail.

“Why Things Become Unpopular.” Phys.org – News and Articles on Science and Technology, phys.org/news/2009-06-unpopular.html.

“10 Examples of How 3D Printing Is Changing Consumer Products.” 3D Printing Blog | I.materialise, i.materialise.com/blog/10-examples-of-how-3d-printing-is-changing-consumer-products-meet-10-3d-printing-experts-and-their-dreams/.

Keeley, Joe, et al. “Top 10 Emerging Technologies That Are Changing The World.”MakeUseOf, 15 Sept. 2014, www.makeuseof.com/tag/top-10-emerging-technologies-changing-world/.

https://www.petmd.com/dog/retractable-leashes-are-they-dangerous

studio, UX. “Product Design Process: Four Steps To Build A Product People Will Love.”UX Blog, 22 Sept. 2017, uxstudioteam.com/ux-blog/product-design-process-steps/.

“Worldwise Inc. Recalls Retractable Dog Leashes; Metal Clasp Can Break and Cause Facial and Body Injuries to Dog Owners.” U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, 29 May 2017, www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2008/worldwise-inc-recalls-retractable-dog-leashes-metal-clasp-can-break-and-cause-facial.

Low, Cherlynn. “Michelin’s 3D-Printed Tire Is as Stunning as It Is Futuristic.” Engadget, 7 Aug. 2017, www.engadget.com/2017/08/07/michelin-vision-biodegradable-3d-print-airless-tire/.

Michelin. “The Visionary MICHELIN Concept Tire.” YouTube, YouTube, 13 June 2017, www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tyc4Apyk2Rc

 

“The Greatest Inventions In The Past 1000 Years.” The Greatest Inventions In The Past 1000 Years | EHISTORY, ehistory.osu.edu/articles/greatest-inventions-past-1000-years

Bit Coins: Online Currency

In 2009 a new form of currency paved a wide, shiny highway into a new way of interacting with one another online. Bitcoin is entirely web based and is used to eliminate the third party financial institution. Though the third party system has been and remains successful in online marketplaces, there is still room for error. Things like lost or double payments can’t happen with Bitcoin because it is person to person.

It’s like going on Craigslist and buying a car from the owner with cash. No dealer, no loan, no names. Confidential with as few people involved as need be. This concept applied as a form of cryptocurrency makes untraceable and completely private transactions effortlessly.

Image result for bitcoin

This marriage of technology and economy was crafted with user interface in mind. The explosion of the Bitcoin was remarkable; being easy to store, anonymous, and a hard-limit amount of 12 million. This means the currency will only inflate in value; one Bitcoin is worth $6805.43 now. Early investors are living large, while those who had the chance are thinking about what could have been. But it was such a crazy concept, who knew what would have happened.

The anonymity and ease that comes with Bitcoin can be manipulated in nefarious ways on the deep web. This payment method was a boon for drug and sex trafficking and money laundering schemes that go on in the deep web, out of sight from easy access web searches.

I can see the headline now – “Buy people…With Bitcoin!!”

What is amazing to me about this currency is the effectiveness in permeating society and reworking ways people do things. Although Bitcoin is a highly niche product, it’s easy, small, and comes with many benefits with its use which are key components in the proliferation of a product. And in true Internet Society fashion, the inflation value of Bitcoin has bloated beyond any reasonable worth.